Fire Island Lighthouse Walk for Peace

blogfire Today, local Fire Island residents walked for world peace reflecting on the past terrorist attacks and the 2,974 victims. The event begins at the No Name Walk in Lonelyville, Fire Island and ends at Fire Island Lighthouse, a 168-feet high brick Landmark viewed by many European travelers and immigrants as the first sight of land during the nineteenth century.

During the 1850s, the Lighthouse Board determined Fire Island Light was the most important Coastal Light for transatlantic vessels bound for New York. The first 74-feet high Lighthouse was replaced by the current Primary Coastal Light on November 1, 1858 exhibiting a flashing White light every 60 seconds illuminated by a First-order Fresnel Lens. Mariners nicknamed the new Light, the “Winking Woman” due to the flashing characteristic.

Fire Island Lighthouse is owned by the National Park Service and protected by the serene Lighthouse Beach of the Fire Island National Seashore, a ideal location for peaceful reflection on the senseless acts of violence against our freedom.

Currently, the Lighthouse is maintained and operated by the Fire Island Lighthouse Preservation Society as a private aid to navigation exhibiting a flashing White light every 7.5 seconds illuminated by a DCB-224 Aerobeacon 167-feet above sea level to a visible range of 24 nautical miles.

Fire Island Lighthouse is open year round with daily guided Tower Tours for the public. Long Island’s tallest Lighthouse has 156 winding spiral steps and 36 ladder steps to the gallery (observation deck) of the Lantern Room where you can enjoy spectacular panoramic views of Fire Island!

For more information about the Lighthouse, please click on the photo of this post.

blue_starMap Location:
For Map Directions, please visit the Google Map of Fire Island Lighthouse.

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About Debbie Dolphin

Lighthouse author and photographer living in New England

Posted on September 12, 2007, in Holidays, News and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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